Last edited by Mezikazahn
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae) found in the catalog.

Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae)

Paolo Tongiorgi

Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae)

by Paolo Tongiorgi

  • 384 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pardosa monticola.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesBulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, v. 134, no. 9, Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology ;, v. 134, no. 9.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL1 .H3 vol. 134, no. 9
    The Physical Object
    Pagination335-359 p.
    Number of Pages359
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4859794M
    LC Control Number75650445

      The wolf spider belongs to the kingdom animalia, phylum arthropoda and genus pardosa. The wolf spider got its name from the wolf because just like its namesake it stalks its prey, small wolf. Results? Well the most common species Pardosa lapponica averaged about spiders per square metre. Some simple calculations will tell you just how common wolf spiders are on the Tundra: wolf spiders per hectare. Don’t forget – wolf spiders are only part of the Arachno-fauna in the Arctic.

    Most Wolf Spiders hunt on the ground. Female Wolf Spiders are immediately recognizable in the field because they roam around with a spherical egg-sac attached to their spinnerets. The egg-sac is made up of two halves united by a seam. Newly hatched spiderlings can sometimes be seen riding on the back of their mother (right, Pardosa sp. female). Wolf spiders eat many insect pests. Although they can bite if provoked, the bites of North American wolf spiders are harmless. Researchers study the parenting behavior of wolf spiders. The great French naturalist J. Henri Fabre wrote amusing stories of .

    Pardosa amentata Female Pardosa amentata carrying the spiderlings on her back. (Found: Nyköping Sörmland Sweden. July ) Spotted wolf-spider Wolf spiders hunts its prey on the ground. Runs fast. Carries its egg sac under the abdomen. The hatched babies stay on their mother for some days. The wolf spider is a member of the Lycosidae family, the order Aranedia. There are around species that are found in the United States and about 50 species that are found in Europe. A full grown wolf spider is typically a half an inch to two inches in length; they are usually brown or gray with various stripe-like markings on their backs.


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Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae) by Paolo Tongiorgi Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae). [Paolo Tongiorgi]. Pardosa is a large genus of wolf spiders, with more than described species that are found in all regions of the world.

Species [ edit ] Pardosa abagensis Ovtsharenko, – Class: Arachnida. Araneus monticola (Clerck, ) Pardosa monticola, or pin-stripe wolf spider, [3] is a species of wolf spider found mainly in Europe. It is found in both dry and humid habitats, and up to an altitude of : Lycosidae.

Pardosa monticola usually occurs in open short vegetation in grasslands, meadows, open heaths and dunes, especially where the habitat is old and unimproved. It may be abundant on chalk grassland and stabilised dunes. In Wiltshire, it is almost exclusively found on the short turf of chalk downland (Askins ).

Pardosa, commonly known as Thin-legged Wolf Spiders, is a genus of spiders in the family a spiders have been sighted 73 times by contributing members. Based on collected data, the geographic range for Pardosa includes 7 countries and 18 states in the United States. Pardosa is most often sighted outdoors, and during the month of May.

A new wolf spider species in the Pardosa monticola‐group (Araneae: Lycosidae) from Xinjiang, China Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Natural History 43(7. Pardosa amentata, otherwise known as the wolf spider or spotted wolf spider is a species of spider in the genus Pardosa belonging to the family of wolf spiders, species has a widespread distribution in central Europe and northwestern Europe and are commonly found on the British species hunts its prey on the ground rather than weaving a : Lycosidae.

Pardosa amentata is a mottled brown wolf spider between 5mm and 8mm (about ¼ inch) in length. Females are usually slightly larger than males, and lack the sooty-black hairs on the end of the pedipalps (small leg-like appendages either.

Juvenile male Pardosa monticola. (Found: Nyköping Sörmland Sweden. Apr ) Female Pardosa monticola, still carrying the empty egg sac, just after the spiderlings have hatched and climbed onto her.

(Found: Langhammar Gotland Sweden. June ) Female Pardosa monticola, side view. (Found: Nyköping Sörmland Sweden. May ) Male Pardosa. Wolf spiders are one of the most common species of spiders in North America. Contrary to the name, they are solitary creatures and search for prey alone.

What separates them from other spider species is the way in which the female spider carries her eggs —. On the Pardosa monticola species-group from Middle Asia Figs 88 Embolic division of Pardosa gromovi sp.n. (88 91) and P. pseudomixta (92 93): 88, 92 ventral; 89, 93 anterior.

Three new Pardosa species from the mountains of Central Asia. Zootaxa (2): – DOI: /zootaxa Reference page. McKay, R.J. The wolf spiders of Australia (Araneae: Lycosidae): A new species of the genus Pardosa.

Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, – Abstract. Denver, Colorado, United States. 5 Comments; Enlarge Picture. Pardosa spp. (Thin-legged Wolf Spiders) Family Genus Species.

Help identify this spider. Submitted ; Pardosa spp. (Thin-legged Wolf Spiders) Family Genus Species. Help identify this spider. Submitted ; Photographed ; skeptixal In this book, you will learn how wolf spiders are similar to and different from other arachnids. Close-up photographs and diagrams reveal extraordinary details about the spider’s body both inside and out.

And hands-on activities will let you experience how a wolf spider female keeps her eggs and young : Sandra Markle. Other articles where Pardosa is discussed: wolf spider: Thin-legged wolf spiders (Pardosa), which have a lens-shaped, greenish or gray egg sac, have relatively long legs with long spines on the “foot.” Burrowing wolf spiders (Geolycosa), which spend most of their lives in burrows, have heavy front legs that are used for digging.

The wolf spiders with. Unlike most spiders, wolf spiders don't hunt with webs. Instead, they chase their prey using their fast running ability. These spiders are often big and hairy which alarms some people, but they are primarily nuisance pests.

Over species of wolf spiders are found in. A female Wolf Spider of the family Pardosa, (Thin-legged Wolf Spiders) carries her young spiderling or hatchlings on her back through stony terrain.

A female Wolf spider (Pardosa monticola) on white background. Wolf spiders are part of the family Lycosidae. Search Results for Pardosa Spiders Stock Photos and Images () Page 1 of 3. 1 2 3. Wolf Spider (Pardosa sp.) Pardosa sp., are also known as Thin-Legged Wolf Spiders.

This is a female I caught near my watering hose. It was a fair bit larger than the male I caught earlier, probably twice as large. You can compare this female to a male I caught earlier here.

Notice how the male has big black furry palps. Like all Wolf Spiders they are robust and Views: K. Italian wolf spiders of the genus Pardosa (Araneae: Lycosidae) (Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, v.

no. 8) [Paolo Tongiorgi] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Paolo Tongiorgi. Wolf spiders of the Pardosa monticola group (Araneae, Lycosidae) VolumePage The lower Triassic formations of the Salt Range and Trans-Indus Ranges, West Pakistan.

Wolf spiders resemble nursery web spiders (family Pisauridae), but wolf spiders carry their egg sacs by attaching them to their spinnerets, while the Pisauridae carry their egg sacs with their chelicerae and of the wolf spider's eight eyes are large and prominent, which distinguishes them from the nursery web spiders whose eyes are all of roughly equal : Arachnida.Description of Pardosa bifasciata Physical Characteristics.

Female 4 to 6 mm. Abdomen dark grey-brown with light grey sides and a light grey median band containing a dark outlined cardiac mark. Carapace dark brown with a light-grey median band and a broad white band along the side in which often a thin black line is present.

Legs light grey brown. Femora along the sides with a. The lycosid genus Pardosa C.L. Koch is one of the largest spider genera in the world; Platnick () lists more than species, with about 60 valid species occurring in Europe. Pardosa spiders are diurnal wandering predators occurring in a variety of environments, but predominantly in open habitats.

Several species have been placed in phenetic species Cited by: 9.